A Message To All You Introverts

A Message To All You Introverts

So, you like being alone. You find your energy by playing video games, reading a book, watching TV in your jimmy jams, or creating stuff by yourself.

Hey! Me too!

But I also love meeting new people, making amazing business connections and hearing the stories of the new people I meet.

Wait, that's pretty extroverted, right?

So, how did I get to be an extroverted introvert? And how can you also become one?

Let's start with my introverted backstory and get to where I am today writing this blog post...

My Introverted Backstory

I spent the better part of 8 years of my childhood (from kindergarten to 7th grade) out in the country living on a couple of acres of wooded forest in a beautiful yellow Victorian home that my mother (an interior designer) and my father (an architect) had designed and built.

The house was built in a way that catered to our every need as a family. Just me, mom, dad, and my big sister.

I was at least a half hour from any of my school friends and though I spent quite a good amount of time with them, I spent way more time by myself playing in my room, making videos in the basement, or playing outside in the woods.

Those 8 years of my life nourished my creative mind and allowed me to create things to do from the solitary time that I spent.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I loved playing alone and writing stories, making videos, drawing, reading, playing video games, etc.

And this wasn’t for a lack of my parents being around or my sister being at home. I could just have easily have gone downstairs and hung with mom and dad or walked across the second-floor landing to my sister’s room, but I think I just preferred playing by myself a lot of the time.

I have to believe that those years of creativity brought me to where I am today in terms of my artistic and creative abilities.

However, I think those years also allowed me to highly favor being alone. Being introverted. Preferring the solitary life of creativity and exploration of my mind.

Even through college, I kept an introverted mindset — not speaking up much in class, not making many friends other than the ones I shared a townhouse with who I had known for years, preferring time with my wife (my girlfriend at the time) and my close friends to partying and meeting new people.

I felt uncomfortable in rooms full of strangers.

Oddly enough, I found solace on stage performing with my band. 

There was just a difference between being at a party among people I didn’t know and being on a stage, separated by the stage front from those people I didn’t know.

A welcomed barrier.

After college, I started to have regrets about not meeting more people and making more relationships. 

I realized how many connections I could have made and how it could have helped me in my future career.

However, I never thought I would be able to shake myself of this Introverted-ness. 

I figured that it was just a part of who I was, part of my genetic makeup or something.

Where It All Changed

So, naturally, about a year after graduating from college, I decided to do the most extroverted thing possible. 

I started my own company.

To be honest, I didn’t even really think about this move changing my life.

I knew I loved making videos, I loved taking photos, I loved making websites, and I loved working on the internet.

Actually, I felt I didn’t even really need to meet many people to be able to do this. In fact, all of the work I currently do with Spencer Pugh Media can be done solely online through online communication.

But something awesome happened when I took that step of selling myself as a content creator for companies in Roanoke.

I started to meet really awesome people.

At first, I was pretty nervous to start making connections and relationships, but I also quickly realized that this was the only way that I would be able to make this new company work. And I was ready to learn whatever I needed to in order to never return to a “desk job” again.

But as I started to meet new people I realized that they were really similar to me. Either they had started their own companies and were eager and hungry to learn and grow and/or they were really creative and artsy and had a lot in common with my creative side.

Needless to say, I’ve fallen in love with meeting new people. I also quickly realized that wanting to HELP those people first and foremost lead to better, stronger relationships and always paid me back in some way or another.

Read more about how working for free and GIVING first can truly help your business, here.

My Message To You

Maybe you’re just like I was. Maybe you think that you don’t have the social skills to make good connections and build strong relationships — business or otherwise.

But take it from me. If I can do it, you can too.

In the end, I think it took me throwing myself out there and knowing that the alternative was working a 9-5 that I hated.

I’m so glad I made that decision. 

For one, I now work for myself and energetically make the content I love for clients that I love.

And secondly, I have met some amazing people and built some great relationships with others I’m proud to call my friends.

And that last one is enough reason for me to keep moving in the direction I’m going. I think it could be for you, too.

Discussion

Was this blog post familiar to you? If so, hit me up in the comments below with your story, or feel free to email me here. I’d love to hear your story and help in any way I can.

Helping people is what I love best!

I am a mild introvert. But I have learned to be a very successful extrovert because if you want impact, you have to work with people.
— Patrick Pichette